Monthly Archives: September 2016

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World's Deepest Underwater Cave Discovered – Live Science


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Live Science
World's Deepest Underwater Cave Discovered
Live Science
It is about 39 feet (12 m) deeper than what is now the world's second-deepest cave, Italy's Pozzo del Merro. Polish diver Krzysztof Starnawski first explored Hranická Propast in 1999. The type of limestone formation he found led him to believe that the
World's deepest underwater cave found in Czech RepublicThe Guardian

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Trump foundation was never certified to receive donations: report – New York Daily News


Donald Trump’s foundation could become a charity case. 

The Republican nominee’s namesake foundation never obtained the certification required to solicit public donations, a spokesman for the New York Attorney General’s office has revealed.

The findings could prompt AG Eric Schneiderman to order the Donald J. Trump Foundation to stop raising money immediately, the spokesperson told Daily News. With a court order, Schneiderman could even force Trump to return money already raised by the foundation.

The Trump campaign did not return multiple requests for comment Thursday.

NY AG Eric Schneiderman to investigate Donald Trump’s foundation

New York State Law clearly mandates that any charity soliciting more than $25,000 a year in public donations must go through a special registration process. Since the Trump foundation is headquartered in the city, it inevitably falls into that category. Furthermore, a charity as large as Trump’s must also comply with annual audits that probe whether employees have personally benefited from donations.

Tax records obtained by the Washington Post show that the Trump foundation has raised more than $25,000 a year for the past 10 years.

A glaring example of apparent financial overreach is found on a website called Donaldtrumpforvets.com, which the foundation set up earlier this year. The website, which claims to support “our great Veterans,” boasts that it has pulled in over $1.6 million in public donations.

The foundation has also received more than $2.3 million from companies that owed Trump or one of his businesses money. But rather than paying him back personally, the companies were ordered to donate to the foundation, tax records show.

Bill Clinton bashes Trump for using foundation to pay Florida AG

A spokesman for Schneiderman did not say if the Attorney General’s office is actively investigating the foundation’s lack of registration.

Schneiderman launched an investigation into the foundation earlier this month after bombshell reports suggested the Republican nominee was using money from the charity to make political gifts and settle legal disputes on behalf of his for-profit businesses.

The donaldtrumpforvets.com boasts of collecting millions of dollars in public donations.

The donaldtrumpforvets.com boasts of collecting millions of dollars in public donations.

(donaldtrumpforvets.com)

The Trump foundation was founded in 1987 and for years, Trump was its sole donor. However, starting in 2000, the foundation began collecting public donations.

The scathing allegations against Trump come less than 48 hours after a report claimed the GOP candidate conducted illegal business in Cuba during Fidel Castro’s Communist rule in the ’90s.

Donald Trump attacks ‘disgusting’ ex-Miss Universe — again

Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway defended the blowhard mogul’s alleged Cuba dealings Thursday, claiming he “respected (the) embargo.”

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Why unique baby names are trending in the US – CBS News


Babies in the United States are less and less likely to share their names with other kids, new research finds.

The trend toward increasingly unique baby names is long-standing, but some researchers had speculated that parents might turn back to tradition amidst the uncertainty of the 2008 Great Recession. Not so, according to a new analysis of Social Security naming data published online Sept. 20 in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology.

“Through the recession and afterward, American parents continued the trend toward choosing more unique names​ for their children​,” said Jean Twenge, a psychologist at San Diego State University and author of “Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled – and More Miserable Than Ever Before” (Free Press, 2007). “That’s surprising, because the outsize individualism of the mid-2000s seemed to fade during the recession as the country tightened its belts.” [Sophia’s Secret: The 10 Most Popular Baby Names]

One-of-a-kind names

Twenge and her colleagues reported in 2010 that Americans had become more fixated on finding unique names for their children. An analysis of the Social Security name database, which contains the names of everyone with a social security number, revealed, for example, that about 40 percent of boys received one of the 10 most common names in the 1880s, but fewer than 10 percent of boys got a top-10 name in 2007.  

Multiple lines of research suggest that American culture has been getting increasingly individualistic for at least a century. Surveys reveal more self-focus and less empathy in today’s young people than the youth of previous generations, for example, and books are now more likely to contain individualistic words and phrases like “all about me” and “self.” Baby names can be an “incredible” window into such individualism, Twenge said. Since choosing a baby’s name is not just an attitude measured on a survey, but also a behavior, those names reveal how people are acting, not just what they’re saying, Twenge told Live Science.

Twenge and her colleagues found that the percentage of babies receiving the most popular names continued its downhill slide between 2004 and 2015, with the recession causing nary a hiccup in the trend. Between 2004 and 2006, 10.09 percent of U.S. baby boys got a top-10 name. This percentage declined to 8.6 percent between 2008 and 2010, before falling to 8.15 percent between 2011 and 2015.

The increase in unique name choices was more extreme for boys than for girls, possibly because creativity in boy names has historically lagged behind creativity in girl names, Twenge said. Between 2004 and 2006, 8.2 percent of new baby girls got a top-10 name. From 2008 to 2015, that percentage declined to 7.88.

The same patterns held when analyzing the top 25 names or the top 50 names, and in fact were a little stronger, Twenge said. That was an interesting finding, because the popularity of top-50 names isn’t as well publicized as the annual list of the top 10, she said.

It’s not the economy​

The researchers also examined the naming trends against the background of the economy. Some theorists had speculated that increased economic hardship might make people more focused on the community, and thus cause a decline in individualism. One study, published in 2013 in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, found increases of communal behavior like charitable activity among high-schoolers during the 2008 recession. But baby names didn’t follow that pattern, Twenge said. [7 Baby Myths Debunked]

There was also no difference in the trend toward uniqueness​ between Texas and California, two states that were affected very differently by the recession. (All of the results were adjusted to take the immigration rateinto account, as immigrants presumably bring new names with them into the country.)

“There’s just a longer-scale trend toward uniqueness and individualism that isn’t necessarily rooted in these economic cycles,” Twenge said.

The researchers did find that higher median family income correlated with the trend toward fewer common names. Income inequality also correlated with fewer Sophias and Jacobs, which are two of the most popular baby names for girls and boys, respectively. These findings don’t prove that income and relative income explain all the unique baby names out there. However, other scientists have found that income inequality correlates with higher self-regard.  

“Maybe people feel like they need to stand out more because only some people make it,” Twenge said.

It’s important to note that, opinions on the name Nevaeh aside, today’s Millennial parents aren’t dramatically more monstrous than the Gen-Xers or Baby Boomers that came before. The change in individualism has been gradual, moving only a few points on the scale from generation to generation. And Americans still value friends and family as much as they ever did, even as they become less communal in other ways, according to 2012 research.

Besides, some facets of individualism are probably good. Millennials​ tend to value differences and practice tolerance, Twenge said. Individualism is a lens to help people understand cultural shifts, both good and bad, she added.

“I’d like to start a conversation, to have people talk about the changes in our culture,” she said. 

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Dolphins' offense already reaching breaking point of season – ESPN (blog)


Miami Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill usually is the consummate optimist. But his body language and poignant comments following Thursday night’s 22-7 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals were telling.

“It was probably one of the worst performances I’ve seen from our offense in a long time,” Tannehill told reporters after the game. “We did some decent things in the run game. We just couldn’t get anything going in the passing game. No consistency, not enough execution, too many mistakes — it was bad.

“We have to get it fixed soon. By soon I mean Monday. It’s gone on too long. There’s no more excuses. There’s no more waiting. It has to be important to everyone on that field. We have to get it fixed right now.”

Miami’s offense already has reached its breaking point four games into the season. Make no mistake, this group is the primary reason the team is 1-3.

On Thursday, the Dolphins scored a touchdown on their first play — a 74-yard catch by receiver Kenny Stills — and gained just 148 yards and zero points the remainder of the game. They lost the time of possession battle (38:20 to 21:58) for the fourth straight week, which wears down the defense, and got just eight first downs in four quarters against the Bengals (2-2).

The leaks are coming from everywhere with Miami’s offense. It is time coach Adam Gase, the rest of his staff and the offensive players ask themselves tough questions at the quarter mark of the season.

  • Do the Dolphins have the right personnel to run Gase’s system?

  • Is Tannehill to blame or are too many bad things happening around him?

  • Is Gase calling the right plays and consistently putting them in position to succeed?

It’s all not working right now, although the Dolphins have 10 days to prepare for their next game Oct. 9 against the Tennessee Titans.

“It is literally somebody different every time,” Gase explained. “Whether it be the play call, whether it be the quarterback, the running back, the lineman, the wide receiver. It’s everybody. We’re all taking turns.”

Tannehill certainly deserves his share of the blame. He had two big turnovers Thursday with an interception and a lost fumble. Tannehill has as many turnovers (six) as touchdowns (six) after four games and is not converting nearly enough on third down, when the Dolphins were 2-of-11 on Thursday. As the quarterback and leader, it’s up to Tannehill to lift the team during a rough patch, and that isn’t happening.

Miami’s offensive line had played fairly well this season — Tannehill was sacked just once in his previous two games against New England and Cleveland. However, the line broke down against the Bengals. Offensive linemen Ja’Wuan James, Jermon Bushrod and rookie Laremy Tunsil all made mistakes that led to sacks. The lack of protection was reminiscent of Tannehill’s first four seasons.

If we learned anything in four games, it’s that Miami’s offense will not be a quick fix. Gase came to Miami with a strong pedigree working with quarterbacks and offenses, but the growing pains are going to be immense.

Gase made a big personnel switch on defense Thursday by benching No. 1 cornerback Byron Maxwell, but didn’t seem headed toward any drastic moves on offense after the loss.

“I don’t think it matters who is out there right now,” Gase said. “We all just can’t get out of our own way.”

According to ESPN Stats & Information, only 14 percent of teams that started 1-3 have made the playoffs since 1990. The Dolphins appear to be part of the other 86 percent unless the offense can quickly and drastically turn things around.

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Tim Burton's latest film doesn't just lack diversity, it lacks personality – The Verge


20th Century Fox

On Thursday, a minor shock wave went through social media as Bustle published a short piece quoting director Tim Burton in conjunction with his new film, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. Associate entertainment editor Rachel Simon apparently asked Burton why his films — 36 of them to date — focus almost exclusively on white characters. His dismissive response, weirdly enough, had virtually nothing to do with the modern world, or even with the specifics of casting or conceiving his own films: he flashed back to his childhood annoyance over The Brady Bunch adding “an Asian child and a black,” and praised himself for not demanding that blaxploitation films should include more white people. “Things either call for things, or they don’t,” he said. That’s such a broad and indeterminate statement that it could mean almost anything, but in context, it seems to translate to “My movies don’t have any specific call for non-white people.”

Burton is certainly under no obligation to cast non-white actors in his films. But his comments to Bustle aren’t startling because he’s defending his casting, they’re startling because they show such a profound disconnect from both the issue of diversity and the modern world as a whole. Miss Peregrine is Burton’s first film with a black actor in a leading role: Samuel L. Jackson plays the villain, a chipper, urbane, eyeball-eating monster named Barron. Burton certainly could have pointed Simon to the film he was promoting, and called it evidence that he’s aware of his racial homogeneity, and taking steps to combat it. Or he could have pointed out that some of his most famous movies take place in self-aware parodies of 1950s suburbia, where pervasive whiteness is part of the joke. Others are set in high-gloss fantasy lands where racial inclusion might make the characters seem more like actual people, and less like the props they’re meant to be. Given how often he’s cast Johnny Depp and his ex-wife Helena Bonham Carter as his leads, he might even have been able to pretend he’s not interested in looking outside his preferred repertory company.

Instead, he used strangely racially charged language to complain about a TV show from his childhood, and implied that because of a genre that peaked and all but disappeared more than 40 years ago, he’s justified in ignoring non-white actors today. Both of these examples are so dated that they suggest a profound disconnect from the world — not just from diversity issues, but from any understanding of modern cultural concerns.

Curiously, that same disconnect is exactly what’s wrong with Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. Burton’s adaptation of Ransom Riggs’ 2011 bestseller is a manic but emotionally inert movie that packs on the quirks without finding any personality underneath them. It feels like a curio — not an eerie, unexplained one, like the vintage photographs that inspired Riggs’ Miss Peregrine trilogy, but a dated and familiar one, yanked out of the dusty old boxes piled up in the Burton archive.

[embedded content]

Ender’s Game star Asa Butterfield plays Miss Peregrine protagonist Jake, a frustrated teenager raised on his grandfather’s fantastical stories about fighting monsters in World War II, and living in a Welsh orphanage full of children with unexplained powers. But Jake is old enough to dismiss those stories as fantasies, and he resents his grandfather for presenting them as the truth. (It’s essentially the plot of Burton’s Big Fish all over again.) When his grandfather (Terence Stamp) dies, seemingly killed by one of the monsters he described, Jake winds up in the care of a psychiatrist (Allison Janney), who nudges him toward investigating his grandfather’s stories. So Jake and his dad (Chris O’Dowd, completely wasted in a nothing role) go to Wales, where Jake finds that the orphanage is a burnt-out shell in the present day. At the same time, the building is intact inside a “time loop.” There, the eerie kid residents perpetually repeat the same day from 1943, under the protection of Miss Peregrine (Eva Green), a sort of elaborately styled benevolent Cruella de Vil who sometimes turns into a blue falcon.

Burton’s movies have always followed the theme that it’s lonely but rewarding being different, and that there’s a wholesome innocence in the macabre. Miss Peregrine’s Home sticks to the pattern. The orphanage is full of “peculiars” — young people with circus-sideshow anomalies, including a body full of bees, an oddly positioned extra mouth, and the ability to set things on fire with a touch. They feel like off-brand X-Men, with Miss Peregrine as a much more fashion-forward Professor X. (That’s no coincidence: screenwriter Jane Goldman co-scripted X-Men: First Class and has a story credit on Days Of Future Past, and the way she introduces the kids — running around the house and showing off their abilities one by one — is right out of the First Class playbook.) But the X-Men have goals that define them, and that drive the action of their stories. Miss Peregrine’s kids are just scenery. None of them have much personality, including Jake’s obligatory love interest Emma (Ella Purnell). They’re just meant as stakes in the war against Barron and his monster compatriots, who want to eat all the peculiars’ eyeballs because for some reason, they confer humanity on inhuman things.

Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children

Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children

Much like Burton could have explained his casting choices in a variety of sensible ways, Miss Peregrine could have done a lot more with the premise of a group of kids trapped in childhood for decade after decade, unable to leave their remote island without dying. The story echoes Peter Pan, but with more distinctive and capable Lost Boys, with their own unique powers. For that matter, the endless repetition of the same day recalls Groundhog Day, which found poignancy in the gimmick. Miss Peregrine also resembles other stories about collections of freaks and geeks who have to unite to survive, including Katherine Dunn’s Geek Love and Genevieve Valentine’s Mechanique. All these stories have depth in ways Miss Peregrine lacks.

But Burton’s movie isn’t interested in subtext, or the characters’ humanity, or any larger story than the dull, familiar fantasy fight against a cartoonishly simple foe. Samuel L. Jackson plays a character very similar to his glowering baddie in Jumper: He’s evil because he’s evil, with no bigger reason given. Everything about Miss Peregrine feels arbitrary: the peculiars’ widely diverse mutations and abilities, the villains’ actions (how exactly did they find out that peculiars’ eyeballs cure monsterism?), the film’s mechanics of time travel, and especially Jake’s choices. (Those notably include making a major life decision toward the end of the film, then instantly changing his mind, without reflection or explanation, just in time to make things extremely difficult for himself.) It’s a parade of mindless and unsatisfying action, weighed down with cartloads of exposition and backstory that complicate the narrative without making it any richer.

And none of the characters feel like people. Green’s portrayal of Miss Peregrine is arch, performative fun, all swagger and style that would sit comfortably next to Jennifer Jason Leigh swanning it up as a big-time reporter in the Coen brothers’ Hudsucker Proxy. But even her character is a bunch of mismatched bits of quirk — time-loop powers, bird-form powers, pointy hair, altruistic maternal feelings — that don’t add up into anything consistent or coherent. Burton packs in the CGI spectacle, most notably in a rambunctious, nonsensical climactic fight between animated skeletons and faceless monsters on a carnival pier in the dead of winter. But much as with his Alice In Wonderland, it’s all slick surface, and no substance.

There’s a sense, watching Burton’s movies since 2003’s Big Fish, that he’s lost touch with the kind of humanity he brought to his earliest films. The Maitlands’ awkward fight to come to terms with their own deaths in Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands’ alien-doll attempts to become a real boy, Ed Wood striving to create art in spite of his complete lack of talent — they all had real pathos to go with the wacky humor and frantic slapstick. But too many of Burton’s films take place in their own frozen time loops, where the action wheels spin frantically, and Johnny Depp mugs ferociously, but the characters don’t develop in any significant way. Miss Peregrine‘s time-trapped kids, Depp’s squeaky-voiced version of Willy Wonka, Sweeney Todd with his endless mad revenge scheme, and Burton with his decades-old Brady Bunch resentments all have the same problem. They’re stuck, and they have no interest in moving forward. Adding more non-white characters wouldn’t fix the problems with Burton’s films. He needs to make some sort of meaningful connection with the world — preferably the modern one, where actual diverse people live even if they aren’t “called for” — to make his arguments sound valid, and to make his fantasies feel real again.


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Shimon Peres funeral: "Israel grieves for him" – CNN



Early Friday morning, Peres’ casket was loaded onto a hearse for the drive from the Knesset — the Israeli parliament of which he was a member for more than 45 years — to the national cemetery at Jerusalem’s Mount Herzl.
  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shakes hands with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas
  • Obama says presence of Abbas “is a gesture and a reminder of the unfinished business of peace.”
  • US President Bill Clinton says Peres “started off life as Israel’s brightest student, became its best teacher, and ended up its biggest dreamer.”
  • Netanyahu on Peres: “Israel grieves for him, the world grieves for him, but we find hope in his legacy, as does the world.”
Former US president Clinton gave a moving eulogy at the ceremony on Mount Herzl.

Former US president Clinton gave a moving eulogy at the ceremony on Mount Herzl.

World leaders

A long list of dignitaries and foreign leaders arrived in Jerusalem to pay their respects, including President Barack Obama, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, Egypt’s Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry and the leaders of France and Germany.
President Obama took time to greet guests before the ceremony.

President Obama took time to greet guests before the ceremony.

A video tweeted by a spokesman for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu showed him shaking hands with President Abbas.
The moment appears to have taken place before the two leaders entered the funeral.
Abbas took his seat in the large white tent on Mount Herzl, while Obama sat next to Chemi Peres, one of Shimon Peres’ sons.
Members of the Knesset guard carry the coffin of former Israeli prime minister Shimon Peres.

Members of the Knesset guard carry the coffin of former Israeli prime minister Shimon Peres.

Around 8,000 police officers have been deployed at key locations to protect world leaders amid fears of a “lone wolf” terrorist attack.
Though Israel Police spokesman Mickey Rosenfeld told CNN Thursday that there was “no concrete intelligence whatsoever” about any potential attacks.

Obama tribute

In the final eulogy of the service, Obama made reference to the presence of President Abbas, stating it was a “gesture and a reminder of the unfinished business of peace.”
He also said that Peres recognized the need for a Palestinian state alongside Israel.
Obama signed off his speech in Hebrew saying: Todah rabah, chaver yakar -- "thank you, dear friend."

Obama signed off his speech in Hebrew saying: Todah rabah, chaver yakar -- "thank you, dear friend."

“Out of the hardships of the diaspora, he found room in his heart for others who suffered,” Obama said
“Even in the face of terror attacks, even after repeated failures in negotiations, he recognized Palestinian self-determination.
“He believed the Zionist idea would be best protected when Palestinians too had a state of their own.”
Obama lamented that Peres “never saw his dream of peace fulfilled.”
President Obama sat next to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the ceremony.

President Obama sat next to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the ceremony.

He recalled his time spent with Peres fondly, a man who was continually enthusiastic about his grandchildren, his love of technology and “a love of words and books and history.”
“Shimon showed us that justice and hope are at the heart of the Zionist idea,” Obama said.
“A free life in a homeland regained. A secure life in a nation that can defend itself, by itself. A full life in friendship with nations that can be counted on as allies, always.”
“This was Shimon Peres’s life. This is the State of Israel. This is the story of the Jewish people during the last century.”

“Great man of Israel”

In his eulogy, Prime Minister Netanyahu said that Peres had “lived a live of purpose… he was a great man of Israel, he was a great man of the world.”
He added: “Israel grieves for him, the world grieves for him, but we find hope in his legacy, as does the world.”
Former US president Clinton made an impassioned speech, claiming that Peres’ “critics described him as a naive, over-optimistic dreamer. They were only wrong about the naive part.
“He knew exactly what he was doing in being overly optimistic… he never gave up on anybody, I mean anybody.
“He started off life as Israel’s brightest student, became its best teacher, and ended up its biggest dreamer.”
Clinton added that in Peres’ honor, “we remember Shimon Peres’ luminous smile, and imagine.”
Former US president Bill Clinton was in attendance to pay his respects to Peres.

Former US president Bill Clinton was in attendance to pay his respects to Peres.

Israeli President Reuven Rivlin, who gave the first eulogy, said that Peres was “the man of whom we thought time could never stop.”
“Your stubborn faith in mankind and the good of people — in the victory of progress over ignorance, in the victory of hope over fear — was your eternal fountain of youth, thanks to which you were the eternal fountain of youth for all of us.”
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahiu paid tribute to Peres who he called "a great man of Israel."

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahiu paid tribute to Peres who he called "a great man of Israel."

Israeli writer Amos Oz, a friend of Peres and one of the country’s most outspoken political doves, used his eulogy to criticize the current Israeli and Palestinian leaders and insist the two sides must continue working for peace.
“Peace is not only possible, it is necessary, because we are not going anywhere. We have nowhere to go. The Palestinians also are not going anywhere. They have nowhere to go… where are the brave leaders who will stand up and realize this?” Oz said.
Each of Peres’ three children spoke at the ceremony.
Tsivya Walden, Peres’ daughter, said her father “had a long and good life.”
“I will remember him during this past year at Friday night dinners at our home, when he was the first to rise for Kiddush, holding the booklet with the Shabbat songs printed in tiny letters, trying to make out the words of the songs through his thick lenses, never skipping a word, singing at the top of his lungs.”
Israeli soldiers held wreaths during the funeral service.

Israeli soldiers held wreaths during the funeral service.

Yoni Peres, one of his sons, said his father was “sensitive and caring towards all people.”
“He wasn’t ruled by his ego, he treated everyone as an equal and was always attentive, interested and supportive,” he said.
“He loved his family dearly, and with all the new members that joined us.”
His other son Chemi spoke of his father as a man who never spared any of his energy.
“You made the most of every moment in your life, up to very the end,” he said.
“We will remember you as one whose greatness stemmed from a deep passion to serve a great cause, and not out of a desire for power.”

Israelis pay respects

Peres’ body was lying in state Thursday at the Knesset ahead of Friday’s funeral ceremony.
A steady trickle of mourners streamed past police and journalists to pay their last respects, with many stopping to take selfies with the flag-draped coffin in the background.
Israelis wait to pass by the coffin of former Israeli President Shimon Peres, September 29, 2016.

Israelis wait to pass by the coffin of former Israeli President Shimon Peres, September 29, 2016.

An estimated 25,000 people passed in the first eight hours of public visitations, Knesset spokesman Yotam Yakir said.
Some expressed admiration and respect for the man, even though they disagreed with him politically.
“My heart wanted to come and take part in this day. We say goodbye to an icon that represents Israel in the world and I wanted to thank him,” said a 25-year-old Jerusalemite who identified himself as Jonathan D.
Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas was at the ceremony.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas was at the ceremony.

But, he added, “I was against a lot of things and ideas he supported related to the Palestinians and the peace process. Oslo was not a benefit for Israel. But I am sure that Mr. Peres did those things because he thought it was the best thing for Israel.”
Reut Ran supported Peres on the peace process, but fears it has no future without him.
“Not with the political climate here today becoming more right-wing and more violent,” said Ran, who was born in Israel, spent 30 years in the US and moved back to Israel six years ago.

Presidents, royals also attend

French President Francois Hollande and Britain's Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, were both in attendance.

French President Francois Hollande and Britain's Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, were both in attendance.

Prince Charles and British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson are also attending, along with former UK Prime Ministers Tony Blair and David Cameron.
The presidents of France, Germany, Ukraine, the Ivory Coast, Togo, Mexico, Lithuania, Serbia and Romania and NATO’s secretary general and the grand duke of Luxembourg, among others were also due to attend.
Arab leaders are notably absent, although the King of Morocco was expected to send a representative.

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Trending: Mourinho unhappy with coach, Klopp clears the air with Sakho – ESPN FC (blog)


The FC crew evaluate Jose Mourinho’s lineup choices after Manchester United’s narrow win over Zorya in the Europa League.

Here are the latest stories for Friday.

MAN UNITEDJose Mourinho has said he was unhappy with Manchester United coach Giovanni Cerra ahead of Thursday’s 1-0 victory over Zorya Luhansk because his instructions left Paul Pogba confused.

– Mourinho has called his side’s packed October fixture list a “poisoned gift” in the wake of their 1-0 Europa League defeat of Zorya.

– Jose Mourinho’s pursuit of Paul Pogba last season was thwarted by an agreement between Juventus and the French midfielder’s agent, says Mino Raiola.

LIVERPOOL: Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp has cleared the air with defender Mamadou Sakho. Sakho has not played for the Reds’ first team since April, when he was suspended following a positive doping test.

SOUTHAMPTON: Southampton chairman Ralph Krueger has said the allegations of impropriety against first-team assistant Eric Black are a “personal issue for him” and that the club plan to cooperate fully with the FA as they seek more details on the matter.

INTER MILAN: Inter Milan manager Frank de Boer blamed his players for starting their Europa League clash with “the wrong attitude” as they slumped to a 3-1 defeat to Sparta Prague on Thursday.

LIGUE 1: Nice coach Lucien Favre said he substituted Mario Balotelli at half-time of Nice’s UEFA Europa League defeat to Krasnodar because the summer signing had a sore throat.

PSG: Paris Saint-Germain have received an unexpected boost in their quest to reintegrate their estranged ultras to the Parc des Princes crowd in order to improve the home match atmosphere.

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The Latest: Hurricane Matthew grows to Category 2 storm – Fox News


The Latest on Hurricane Matthew (all times local):

Hurricane Matthew has strengthened to a Category 2 storm as it moves through a part of the Caribbean that rarely sees such storms.

The storm’s maximum sustained winds early Friday have increased to near 100 mph (161 kph). The U.S. National Hurricane Center says additional strengthening is forecast and Matthew could become a major hurricane later in the day or Friday night.

Matthew is centered about 125 miles (201 kilometers) north of Curacao and 565 miles (909 kilometers) east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica, and is moving west near 14 mph (22 kph).

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Hoboken mother, 34, dead in major NJ Transit crash – New York Daily News


Globetrotting Fabiola Bittar de Kroon’s last trip was a Thursday morning jaunt to the Hoboken Terminal.

The 34-year-old mom seemed to have it all: the man of her dreams, an 18-month-old baby girl and a high-powered career that sent her around the world before bringing her to the New York area.

“It’s incredibly sad that this child won’t know her mother,” a friend said after de Kroon became the lone fatality in the horrific NJ Transit train crash in Hoboken.

Her mother, Sueli Bittar, speaking with the Daily News from Santos, Brazil, was still reeling from the news of Fabiola’s shocking death.

NJ Transit crash in Hoboken could snarl travel for weeks

“I had a beautiful, clever daughter and I have a wonderful granddaughter,” Bittar said. “Her husband is a wonderful guy. I don’t know what to tell you because it’s very hard for us now. It is very sad.”

https://www.linkedin.com/in/fabiola-bittar-de-kroon-7015b222

Fabiola Bittar de Kroon was the only fatality of the NJ Transit crash in Hoboken, which also injured more than 100 people.

(via LinkedIn)

De Kroon, a Hoboken resident, was an accomplished and driven woman who always carved out time for her family — with Sueli Bittar saying her daughter and son-in-law had discussed having a second child.

The friend, who asked to remain anonymous, told The News the happily married couple were deeply in love.

“She and her husband married several years ago and they spent a long time fostering a beautiful relationship,” said the friend, who studied with de Kroon while she was earning her MBA in Florida.

Mandated train control tech could’ve stopped NJ Transit wreck

“They recently made the decision to have a child and I know that was really big for them,” said the friend. “When the baby arrived it was hugely important to Fabiola.”

https://www.facebook.com/daan.d.kroon

Daan de Kroon, husband of train crash victim Fabola Bittar de Kroon.

(Facebook)

De Kroon, a native of Santos, Brazil, married Daan de Kroon eight years ago, according to their social media pages. The two resided in Miami and then Sao Paolo, and Daan’s family lived in Europe.

“She was so outgoing, very smart and career-focused, but she was also open to other cultures,” said her friend. “She loved being social, going out for meals, hanging out with friends.

“She and her husband were such a great couple to be with because they had such synergy together.”

Eighteen months ago, the couple welcomed a baby girl, Julia — and quickly became doting parents, the friend said. On Thursday, Fabiola left her daughter at day care and headed to the Hoboken Terminal to catch a train, according to WNBC-TV.

Her husband was traveling at the time of the accident, and he returned to Hoboken hours later to pick up their daughter after learning of Fabiola’s death.

The two had only arrived one year ago in Hoboken.

“She was so beautiful, so energetic, such a beautiful smile,” the friend said.

De Kroon worked until recently as a lawyer in Brazil for SAP, a global computer software company. A company spokesman said her ex-colleagues were “profoundly saddened” by de Kroon’s death.

AP PROVIDES ACCESS TO THIS THIRD PARTY PHOTO SOLELY TO ILLUSTRATE NEWS REPORTING OR COMMENTARY ON FACTS DEPICTED IN IMAGE; MUST BE USED WITHIN 14 DAYS FROM TRANSMISSION; NO ARCHIVING; NO LICENSING; MANDATORY CREDIT

The victim’s husband was traveling at the time of the accident and is returing to New Jersey.

(AP)

“We express our deepest condolences to her family, friends, and all those impacted by today’s tragic event,” the spokesman said.

Two women aboard the doomed train — one five months pregnant, the other a mother of two kids — managed to escape with their lives from the Pascack Valley line train crash.

Alexis Valle, 24, was sitting in the front car of the train when the terrifying wreck occurred. She never expected to leave the train with her life.

“I thought we were going to die,” said the Bergenfield, N.J., woman, referring to her unborn child. “I didn’t think we were going to get out.”

https://www.facebook.com/daan.d.kroon

Fabiola Bittar de Kroon, 34.

(Facebook)

Valle said she felt the train accelerate as they were supposed to slow down before arriving at the Track 5 platform. There was a massive crash, and the car’s ceiling collapsed on her head.

Fellow commuters helped her to safety through the train window as she became the first of 108 injured to escape from the wreckage.

Valle, who needed four staples to close a gash on her head, said her baby received a clean bill of health too. Her mom, Jeanette, rushed to Hoboken from Brooklyn to check in on both daughter and future grandchild.

“You’re relieved to hear she’s alive, because she was saying the people behind her, she didn’t known if they made it,” Jeanette Valle said.

https://www.facebook.com/daan.d.kroon

Fabiola Bittar de Kroon, 34, pictured here with her husband Daan de Kroon.

(Facebook)

One car behind Valle, a New Jersey mom shared her fears as her mind flashed to her two children — a 19-year-old son and an 11-year-old daughter.

“I’m lucky to be alive for my kids,” said the woman from New Milford, N.J. “I’m so happy. I’m OK.”

Miriam — who declined to give her last name — was rising from her seat when the train slammed into the 109-year-old building. She injured her leg when she went flying into the seat in front of her.

Miriam, instead of heading on the PATH train to her Wall St. job, was instead picked up by her son Emmanuel after X-rays showed no damage to her leg.

https://www.facebook.com/daan.d.kroon

Fabiola Bittar de Kroon is seen with husband Daan de Kroon. 

(Facebook)

She was particularly grateful to a pair of men who stayed with her until first responders brought her outside.

“They were very nice people,” she said. “It made me feel so good that there’s good people.”

Commuter David Mielach walked away from his seat in the first car of the train with nothing more serious than a case of whiplash. He was standing on the train when everything went dark.

“You don’t process it at the moment,” said Mielach. “I just looked around. I climbed out of the train. I had to kick (the window) out. I’m shaken but all right.”

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Was the World Cup of Hockey a success? – ESPN


As the 2016 World Cup winds down, we wondered: Was the eight-team, best-on-best tournament a triumph for the sport? Our writers offered their thoughts.

Well, first off define “success.” Did it make money for the National Hockey League and the players who organized the tournament? If it’s true that every ticket was sold then yes, that part of it was a success. Was the hockey good? Yes. I thought the World Cup featured more, better hockey than we saw at the Sochi Olympics, but nothing that compared to the hockey on display four years earlier in Vancouver at the 2010 Games.

If success is measured in part by pure enjoyment of the product, then having Team North America dazzle us for three tournament games qualifies this World Cup as a rousing success. Europe, the other team that was made up just for this tournament, also far exceeded expectations if you want to add that to the success quotient.

If success is also measured by sustained interest and buzz, then the tournament fell short. As the best-of-three finals opened between dominating Team Canada and upstart Team Europe, it appeared as though fans were weary as opposed to energized. The bottom line is you don’t get to pick who succeeds at these tournaments (even though organizers did their best to pave a way deep into the tournament for Team USA). So the final matchup between Team Europe and Canada has seen the air slowly go out of the event at its pinnacle — even though Team Europe provided a stern test for Canada in Game 1 of the best-of-three finals. Does that mean the tournament is a failure? Hardly. It’s just less of a success than it otherwise might have been.–Scott Burnside

Canada needs competition

What qualifies this World Cup as a success or not? The NHL and NHLPA, I think, will make money. So there’s that. Staging an entire tournament in one city over two weeks takes a whole lot of manpower, and for that I tip my hat the folks at the NHL Players’ Association and the NHL who worked tirelessly over the past 18 months to bring this thing together. A lot of them haven’t had a day off in months.

The empty (although we’re told they were sold) seats for Game 1 of the World Cup finals, not to mention the tepid atmosphere, left a sour taste for me. A clip of Mario Lemieux‘s winning goal from the 1987 Canada Cup played on the big screen during the game Tuesday night and you couldn’t help but be struck by the juxtaposition of it all, the scenes of those delirious fans going out of their minds at Copps Coliseum almost 30 years ago compared with the lifeless crowd on hand at Air Canada Centre.

I’m not blaming the fans — there simply is no rivalry or history between juggernaut Team Canada and the made-up Team Europe. Maybe that’s just it. This tournament will be great again once we get a team to rival Canada, which I suspect will be Team USA next time around given the rising young American star talent. The NHL and NHLPA did a nice job of bringing this event back. A rousing success it was not. I’ll give it a solid B-plus. — Pierre LeBrun

The players clearly cared

I look at this tournament and I see unrealized potential. I can’t help but wonder what a USA-Canada final might have looked like. I also can’t help but wonder if Team North America could have beaten Canada. Maybe not in a series, but man, would I have liked their chances in a one-game, semifinal-knockout opportunity. We would have seen fewer empty seats if one of those scenarios had materialized. What this tournament showed us is that there is real potential for a great World Cup for the ages, even if we didn’t get that here. The players clearly cared. You saw it in the effort turned in by Sidney Crosby and his teammates. You saw it when the veterans on Team Europe buckled down and got serious at just the right time. You saw it in the red eyes of the Americans when they were eliminated. I’ll leave this tournament thinking about what might have been and what might still yet to be at the next one. –Craig Custance

North America-Sweden was worth every penny

I’ve loved the World Cup. I think, from a hockey standpoint, that it was worth holding the entire tournament just to see that 3-on-3 overtime between Team North America and Sweden. Holy crap, that was amazing. I’d be lying, however, if I said the air has felt so electric all the way through. I think that’s a function of the artificiality of the event — unlike those other non-invented sporting events found in nature — and the fact that the World Cup isn’t yet entrenched in the collective hockey mind.

Time will improve its stature. I just hoped for more from Toronto. The surprise success of Team Europe changed the dynamic of the finals (and blame the Americans, not Europe, for being absolutely terrible and blowing the chance for a more compelling matchup), but Canada remains one of the great hockey teams ever assembled, even a perfect one. For that team to play in front of empty seats in a hockey capital is inexcusable to me. — Chris Jones

It was great for the game — at every level

I will watch hockey anywhere, anytime and at any level. It could be a youth, high school, college, junior, minor league or NHL game and I will pay attention. I love the game. For an entire month — which included trips to Gothenburg, Sweden; Helsinki, Finland; Washington, D.C.; and Toronto — I’ve been spoiled by the best talent in the world during this tournament.

The World Cup of Hockey is a good thing. Sure, it has some wrinkles, but this event needs to have a future no matter whether NHLers participate in the Olympics or not. I picked Sweden to win the World Cup championship and that obviously did not come to fruition. Being an American, I was hoping for a better outcome by Team USA. Team North America was like watching a bunch of kids play on the pond. It was exciting and actually brought me out of my seat once or twice. You have to love how Team Europe literally surprised the world and reached the finals against Team Canada. Speaking of the Canadians, this roster has to be one of the greatest collections of talent — ever. After you take time to digest the entire process you will realize this tournament was great for the game of hockey at every level and it needs to happen again. — Joe McDonald

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